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The King's Whore

nytheatre.com q&a preview by Kate O'Phalen
July 6, 2013

What is your job on this show?
Actor.

What is your show about?
State-of-the-Art Seductive and Revolutionary Recounting of Henry VIII & Anne Boleyn’s Debacle of a Relationship.

When did you know you wanted to work in the theater, and why?
I have always wanted to work in the theatre for pretty much as long as I can remember. I was in my first show when I was 6 years old, starring as Oompa Loompa #6 in a community theatre production of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," and that's when I fell in love. I had a crisis of faith in college when I wondered if I could really pull this career off (and briefly contemplated law school...), but I found that I just couldn't let theatre go. It's a part of me that runs through my veins.

Complete this sentence: My show is the only one opening in NYC this summer that...?
...tackles historical issues in an edgy and exciting way. Most people know who Queen Anne Boleyn was, but no one knows *this* Anne, I promise!

Is there a particular moment in this show that you really love or look forward to? Without giving away surprises, what happens in that moment and why does it jazz you?
We have a really fun court dance in the show that is not at all the standard, boring partner dance that you think of when you think of old-fashioned court dances. This one mixes period dance themes with some very modern moves to create a dance like you've never seen before! The whole cast loves the mash-up and how fun it is to perform.

Which “S” word best describes your show: SMOOTH, SEXY, SMART, SURPRISING?
Sexy. Definitely sexy. But to be fair, I think this production is also a pretty surprising one, too!

Can theater bring about societal change? Why or why not?
I think theater is one of the major ways *to* bring about societal change. People in the theater talk about things way before everyone else does, and help force them into the mainstream consciousness. Simply getting everyone to talk things can make a huge difference. Our director, for instance, worked on a play about octopuses, and it made such an impact on her, that she doesn't eat octopus anymore. That's a silly example maybe, but it works on a larger scale, too!