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Rudy on Drums

nytheatre.com q&a preview by Hannah Benitez
June 16, 2013

What is your job on this show?
Playwright/Director.

What is your show about?
Rudy On Drums is a dark DARK comedy that pushes theatrical boundaries with a-typical themes and a not-so-average love triangle

Where were you born? Where were you raised? Where did you go to school?
I was born and raised in Miami Florida. I went to New World School of the Arts High School where I had some of the most amazing teachers and training a lady could hope for. I went on to get a BFA in Acting at FSU.

What are some of your previous theater credits? (Be specific! Name shows, etc.)
I had a production of this same play chosen for the Thespis Theater Fest (In Washington Heights) that ran this past March. I've had a short 10 min play produced with The Working Theater Collective in Portland Oregon. A public reading with City Theater's Student Shorts Fest in Miami granted me my membership into the Dramatist Guild. I've also been fortunate to have taken a semester of playwriting with Tarell Alvin Mcraney.

Are there any cautions or warnings you’d like to make about the show (e.g., not appropriate for little kids)?
This show is definitely NOT for children. It's not so much as what's seen on stage, but what's talked about in graphic detail. It's interesting, people are so used to this level of adult content in movies, but when they actually see it in front of them, they writhe in their seats (which is a joy for me to watch them do). Muahahaha!

Which “S” word best describes your show: SMOOTH, SEXY, SMART, SURPRISING?
This show is super sexy, in a weird weird way.

Can theater bring about societal change? Why or why not?
Sure, why not? George Bernard Shaw had to change his ending of Pygmalion because people threw a hissy fit. Clifford Odets' play Waiting For Lefty was labeled as propaganda and sparked public debates. I'd say the same about more contemporary writers like Sarah Cane as well. It just depends on the work.