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The Tempest (Eureka Suitcase)

nytheatre.com q&a preview by Aaron Vega
August 19, 2013

What is your job on this show?
Director/Co-Producer.

What is your show about?
Set in the NYC Subway, a troubled mind seeks revenge and finds forgiveness in this minimalist and imaginative adaptation of THE TEMPEST that connects to everyones struggle with the pressures of the modern world.

What type of theater do you like most to work on?
I enjoy creating theatre that engages the imagination of the audience and the actors. There's a time and place to sit in a dark room and be fed what and how to feel, but theatre, unlike any other entertainment art form, has a unique opportunity to challenge the audience while still being entertaining.

Who is more important in the theater: the actor, the playwright, or the director?
It varies on the kind of piece. In our case it's the playwright. The fact that we are still finding relatable context for Shakespeare's words hundreds of years later is indicative of his unparalleled ability to write the human condition.

How did you meet your fellow artists/collaborators on this show?
This is Eureka Suitcase's NYC premier. It's taken us a while to find a "tribe" of artists that we believe in. But we've worked with them all before in some way, shape, or form. We wanted to make sure that for our first endeavor in NYC we had a group of actors and designers that would be as passionate and dedicated as we were.

Groucho, Chico, Harpo, or Zeppo?
Harpo. Without a doubt.

How important is diversity to you in the theater you see/make?
Diversity is key to making relatable theatre. We've taken a play with only 1 woman and expanded it to 4. We've color blind cast a role and added puppetry to another. Again, it's about trusting the imagination of the audience. If you're committed to your story, the actors are excellent and clear in their portrayal, and you don't apologize for your work, then the audience will go along with you. They want to enjoy themselves and they don't care who's in front of them as long as the acting is good and the story is clear.